Health & Well-Being A-Z

Manganese

piles of processed Manganese
Description

Manganese is an essential mineral required for the body to function properly. It's found in foods such as nuts, whole grains, and leafy green vegetables.

Manganese is the twelfth most common element on the earth's crust. In the body, it's involved in many chemical processes, including the processing of cholesterol, carbohydrates, and protein. It might also be involved in bone formation.

People use manganese for manganese deficiency. It is also used for hay fever, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, wound healing, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Is It Effective?

Effectiveness header

NatMed Pro rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

Effective
  • Manganese deficiency. Taking manganese by mouth or by IV can treat or prevent low manganese levels in the body. IV products can only be given by a healthcare provider.

There is interest in using manganese for a number of other purposes, but there isn't enough reliable information to say whether it might be helpful.

Is it Safe?

Safety

When taken by mouth: Manganese is likely safe for adults 19 years and older when consumed in amounts up to 11 mg daily. But taking more than 11 mg daily by mouth is possibly unsafe. Taking high doses, long-term can lead to Parkinson disease-like symptoms.

When inhaled: Manganese is likely unsafe when used in moderate amounts, long-term. Excess manganese in the body can cause serious side effects, including poor bone health and symptoms similar to Parkinson disease, such as tremors.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Children: Taking manganese by mouth is likely safe for children when consumed in amounts below the daily tolerable upper intake level (UL) by age: less than 2 mg for those 1-3 years; less than 3 mg for those 4-8 years; less than 6 mg for those 9-13 years; and less than 9 mg for those 14-18 years. Taking higher doses is possibly unsafe. Manganese is also likely unsafe when inhaled by children.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Manganese is likely safe when taken by mouth while pregnant or breast-feeding in doses below the tolerable upper intake level (UL). This means less than 11 mg daily for those 19 years and older and less than 9 mg daily in those under 19 years-old. Manganese is possibly unsafe when taken by mouth in higher doses. Doses over 11 mg daily are more likely to cause serious side effects. Taking too much manganese might also decrease the birth size of male infants. Manganese is likely unsafe when inhaled while pregnant or breast-feeding.

Liver disease: People with long-term liver disease have trouble getting rid of manganese. Manganese can build up and cause side effects. If you have liver disease, be careful not to get too much manganese.

Iron-deficiency anemia: People with iron-deficiency anemia seem to absorb more manganese than other people. If you have this condition, be careful not to get too much manganese.

Drug interactions

Antibiotics (Quinolone antibiotics)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Manganese can attach to quinolone antibiotics in the stomach, decreasing the amount of antibiotics that can be absorbed by the body. This might decrease their effects. To avoid this interaction, take manganese supplements at least one hour after quinolone antibiotics.

Antibiotics (Tetracycline antibiotics)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Manganese can attach to tetracycline antibiotics in the stomach, decreasing the amount of antibiotics that can be absorbed by the body. This might decrease their effects. To avoid this interaction, take manganese two hours before or four hours after taking tetracyclines.

Medications for mental conditions (Antipsychotic drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Taking certain antipsychotic drugs along with manganese might worsen side effects of manganese in some people.

Herb interactions

Calcium: Taking calcium along with manganese can decrease the amount of manganese that the body can absorb.
IP-6 (Phytic acid): IP-6 found in supplements can decrease the amount of manganese that the body can absorb. Take manganese at least two hours before or two hours after taking supplements that contain IP-6.
Iron: Taking iron along with manganese can decrease the amount of manganese that the body can absorb.
Zinc: Taking zinc along with manganese can increase the amount of manganese that the body can absorb. This may increase the side effects of manganese.

Food interactions

IP-6 found in foods, such as cereals, nuts, and beans, can decrease the amount of manganese that the body can absorb. Take manganese at least two hours before or two hours after eating foods that contain IP-6.

Taking manganese with milk and/or fat-containing foods might increase how much manganese the body absorbs.

Dosage

It's recommended that adult males 19 years and older consume 2.3 mg of manganese daily and adult females 19 years and older consume 1.8 mg of manganese daily.

As medicine, manganese has most often been used by adults in combination with other ingredients, in doses of 0.5-5.6 mg by mouth daily for up to 24 weeks. Speak with a healthcare provider to find out what dose might be best for a specific condition.

Other names

Aminoate de Manganèse, Ascorbate de Manganèse, Chélate de Manganèse, Chelated Manganese, Chlorure de Manganèse, Citrate de Manganèse, Complexe Aspartate de Manganèse, Dioxyde de Manganèse, Gluconate de Manganèse, Glycérophosphate de Manganèse, Manganèse, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Aminoate, Manganese Ascorbate, Manganese Aspartate Complex, Manganese Chelate, Manganèse Chélaté, Manganese Chloride, Manganese Chloridetetrahydrate, Manganese Citrate, Manganese Dioxide, Manganese Gluconate, Manganese Glycerophosphate, Manganese Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate Monohydrate, Manganese Sulfate Tetrahydrate, Manganeso, Manganeso Quelado, Manganum, Mn, Monohydrate de Sulfate de Manganèse, Quelato de Manganeso, Sulfate de Manganèse.

Disclaimer

Information on this website is for informational use only and is not intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. While evidence-based, it is not guaranteed to be error-free and is not intended to meet any particular user’s needs or requirements or to cover all possible uses, safety concerns, interactions, outcomes, or adverse effects. Always check with your doctor or other medical professional before making healthcare decisions (including taking any medication) and do not delay or disregard seeking medical advice or treatment based on any information displayed on this website.

© TRC Healthcare 2024. All rights reserved. Use and/or distribution is permitted only pursuant to a valid license or other permission from TRC Healthcare.