Health & Well-Being A-Z

Sweet Clover

Sweet Clover plant
Description

Sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis) is a plant native to Europe and now found throughout the world. Its flowering branch and leaf are used as medicine.

Sweet clover contains ingredients that might thin the blood and help wounds heal.

People use sweet clover for varicose veins, poor blood circulation, nerve pain in people with diabetes, bruises, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

Don't confuse sweet clover with red clover. These are not the same.

Is It Effective?

Effective

There is interest in using sweet clover for a number of purposes, but there isn't enough reliable information to say whether it might be helpful.

Is it Safe?

Safety

When taken by mouth: Sweet clover is possibly safe when used appropriately. But it is possibly unsafe when used in large amounts due to the risk for liver damage and bleeding problems.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if sweet clover is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Liver disease: Sweet clover might make liver disease worse. If you have liver problems, speak with your healthcare provider before using sweet clover.

Surgery: Sweet clover might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bleeding during or after surgery. Stop using sweet clover at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Drug interactions

Medications that can harm the liver (Hepatotoxic drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Sweet clover might harm the liver. Some medications can also harm the liver. Taking sweet clover along with a medication that can harm the liver might increase the risk of liver damage.

Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Sweet clover might slow blood clotting. Taking sweet clover along with medications that also slow blood clotting might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding.

Herb interactions

Herbs and supplements that might damage the liver: Sweet clover might harm the liver. Taking it with other supplements that can also harm the liver might increase the risk of liver damage. Examples of supplements with this effect include garcinia, greater celandine, green tea extract, kava, and kratom.
Herbs and supplements that might slow blood clotting: Sweet clover might slow blood clotting and increase the risk of bleeding. Taking it with other supplements with similar effects might increase the risk of bleeding in some people. Examples of supplements with this effect include garlic, ginger, ginkgo, nattokinase, and Panax ginseng.

Food interactions

There are no known interactions with foods.

Dosage

There isn't enough reliable information to know what an appropriate dose of sweet clover might be. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult a healthcare professional before using.

Other names

Angipars, Casse Lunettes, Common Melilot, Couronne Royale, Field Melilot, Hart's Tree, Hay Flower, Herbe aux Puces, King's Clover, Luzerne Bâtarde, Melilot, Mélilot, Mélilot des Champs, Mélilot Commun, Mélilot Jaune, Mélilot Officinal, Mélilot Vulgaire, Meliloti Herba, Meliloto, Melilotus, Melilotus altissimus, Melilotus arvensis, Melilotus macrorrhizus, Melilotus officinalis, Melilotus vulgaris, Petit-Trèfle Jaune, Pratelle, Sweet Lucerne, Sweet Melilot, Tall Melilot, Thé de Jardin, Trébol de Olor, Trèfle des Mouches, Trifolium macrorrhizum, Trifolium officinale, Wild Laburnum, Yellow Melilot, Yellow Sweet Clover.

Disclaimer

Information on this website is for informational use only and is not intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. While evidence-based, it is not guaranteed to be error-free and is not intended to meet any particular user’s needs or requirements or to cover all possible uses, safety concerns, interactions, outcomes, or adverse effects. Always check with your doctor or other medical professional before making healthcare decisions (including taking any medication) and do not delay or disregard seeking medical advice or treatment based on any information displayed on this website.

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